Resourcefulness

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Get used to being resourceful. In fact, work your tiny little butt off at being resourceful all the way through your entire rental future.

This can range from budget shopping, to actually looking around for a better deal instead of taking the first item you see, to haggling when you actually are purchasing something.

Below are a few tips for the utterly resourceful:

  • Budget shop. Check out the Aldi link on the home page, you can find some amazingly cheap items at Aldi that will switch your weekly shopping allocation from 160 dollars down to 90. They’re opening more and more branches in Australia every week. For clothes shopping try DFO (Direct Factory Outlet). You can find some amazingly cheap bargains at these stores.
  • Bulk buy. Try Costco. You pay low, low prices because everything is bought in bulk. Everything. If you have the storage space and/or a large freezer as well as a large initial capital behind you in moving out, head to Costco first.
  • Search around. You think you’ve found an amazing deal at Dick Smith when you find a Dell laptop for 700 dollars, not realising that the computer store around the corner has the same laptop for 550. You don’t help yourself by not calling around searching for the best deal.
  • Wait for EYFS (End year financial sale) This comes around June/July every year with a lot of stores. Be on the look out for any stores.
  • Shop at your local market. We live closest to the Preston and the Camberwell markets and there are some amazing deals on everything from fruits to suits. Don’t be afraid to step out of your shopping comfort zone, often you’ll find a much better deal.
  • Haggle. Haggle like hell. Don’t walk in and pay the price on the sign. Ask how much you can get off, and when you’ve done that, ask for a further 50. Every dollar you save goes back in your pocket.
  • Keep your warranties. There’s nothing worse than taking something home, realising it doesn’t work, trying to take it back and failing because you didn’t keep the warranty.
  • Swap meets. These guys cover anything from computers to lingerie. Normally not in the same market for obvious reasons. You can find some great deals at Swap meets, just remember to take your own things too.
  • Trading Post. It’s online but I rarely see it in shops anymore. Just be aware that unlike a shop, you won’t get a warranty on the item unless it’s explicitly stated.

These are just a few of many. Get used to trying to find the cheapest thing you can. Don’t rely on the “honesty” of shop keepers to get you a good deal. You have to look for it yourself.

Good luck!

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Lead Tenancy

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Lead Tenancy is a program operated by CHL and some government youth housing organisations. If you do a google search on Lead Tenancy+”state”, you should bring back 2-3 top results on the program.

Lead Tenancy is designed for people with excellent morales, organisational skills, cleaning, ethics and responsibility. You need to be prepared to deal with issues that young people face every day, be highly aware of developing problems, and be of an encouraging and respectful nature.

Lead Tenancy runs in a variety of established accommodation (be it units, apartments or houses), who you are allocated to is not your choice, however you can state a preference for male or female co-habitants and you can state a preferred area.

You will be required to look after the individual/s and make sure that they are leading a responsible, good choice life. You will be responsible for their in-house welfare, but are not their parent. This should be remembered when dealing with the youth. You cannot tell them what to do, or how to do it, you can only offer advice.

You will be required to advise on shopping, social choices, cleaning, hygiene, youth issues and troubles. You need to be available to those in your household at all hours, and be able to get back in case something is wrong. You will need to help them in developing meaningful relationships and also in gaining employment.

You have constant contact with the Case Worker who situated the youths. There is a communication book used to log any and all issues and meetings, it is imperative you keep a log. Regular meetings will be arranged to discuss issues within the house.

Lead tenants are not paid. Instead they are offered subsidised or non-existant rent. Do not go into this for the money. Sometimes issues will push you to the edge, the stress of living with a misplaced or irresponsible youth can push you to the edge. However, if you are dedicated to assisting in youth welfare, the money will be of little to no importance and you will be pleased just making sure another youth isn’t left homeless on the streets.

Do it if you feel you are dedicated enough to youth issues. If I didn’t have a partner and wasn’t beginning a family, I’d jump at the opportunity. Anglicare aided me in my youth and I’d do anything I could to repay them for not leaving me homeless.

The experience will leave you with a profound sense of well-being. You are assisting in removing the homeless from our streets and helping and encouraging young people to grow and spread their wings.

I have previously done Lead Tenancy in a small country town. I feel the experience not only helped my co-tenant grow, but also aided me in my responsibility and outlook on life. Be responsible, be encouraging and you will reap the rewards.

Financial Hustle

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Sometimes things travel up shit creek. Sometimes, you have no paddles heading up this creek. Sometimes, a massive freak tidal wave will knock you out of your paddle-less boat travelling up shit creek. Sometimes, after being knocked out of a paddle-less boat travelling up shit creek, you remember you know how to swim and that the shore is reachable.

Yesterday, my car broke down. Brake pads wore out and before I could afford to get the pads fixed the brake discs wore down to metal on metal. Fun fun fun in the sun right?

Not only this but I live an hour and a half on public transport away from my job. No member of our four person household drives but me, nor has a car. We don’t have the finances to get a new car. We are expecting a pay out from my partners old work but we’re not sure when this will come. We have no savings because up until a month ago we were financially irresponsible.

So. We hustled. Tried every avenue to borrow a car, then every avenue to car pool, I’m also seeking a new job closer to home (and higher paying), we’re seeking to purchase a new car and furniture with the pay out coming, we researched public transport routes, remembered my phone is also a music player (for the long trip) and called friends and family to see if they could help.

Remember- You always have more than one option. You are never at a dead-end, and there are always avenues for help and/or assistance. Don’t just give up hope when you’re floating in the creek. Start paddling and aim for shore.